1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Christian fantasy taken to a whole new level, July 5, 2014
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This review is from: Seal of the King (Kindle Edition)
To read Seal of the King is the equivalent of taking a stroll through the plethora of biblical figures that helped to shape Western society. More than an individual love history, this is a book about Christian love, in the sense that David and Aurora’s love history is an underlying symbol for the much larger love Christianity is based upon. David finds himself amidst a series of life changing events and he needs to adapt himself from being a humble farmer to his new role as a warrior of God. He’s an amalgamation of two biblical figures, King David and Saul. David was a simple shepherd, before he was approached by Samuel, and anointed by the prophet. Saul, on the other hand, was much more accustomed to war. King David, too, had to withstand times of war, but he was a poet, a man of singular wisdom and artistic taste. The epic journey David finds himself into got me thinking of Job’s history as well. The path to God’s enlightenment isn’t easy, and David’s Christian values help him through his altruistic path, alongside his Dawn (Aurora). The name Smith chose for Aurora is very appropriate, since it means “Dawn” in Latin. Aurora is, literally, the dawn of David’s life. After meeting her in person, having seen her in his visions and dreams, David’s life will forever be changed.
The prose is well-written and organized. There are chapters with fewer dialogues, whilst other chapters are filled with conversations and vivid descriptions. The depictions of David and Aurora’s faith in the Lord wouldn’t be vivid enough if it wasn’t for the wise choice of perspective. The omniscient narrator can get the reader inside the protagonist’s minds and feelings, keeping a close proximity that is needed in a book about a journey of Faith.
I said before that David has to go through a sudden metamorphosis of simple farmer to warrior, becoming a synthesis of the biblical figures David and Saul. The latter fell in disgrace with God… will David have the same fate? You’ll have to read to find out.
I recommend this book to anyone who wants a renewed interpretation of Christianity and feel like reading an immersive history about complex, faith-driven characters.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A brilliant read, July 4, 2014
 
This review is from: Seal of the King (Kindle Edition)
An amazing fantasy novel. It is extremely well written and I loved the way the characters Aurora and David developed into a love story. I was hooked from the first page.When I finished it, it was like what do I do now? I can’t wait for more from this author. If you love fantasy, love and adventure you’ll love this book. Worth much more than 5 stars.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Longer You Read It, the Better It Gets…, July 4, 2014
By 
K.S. Puckett (Atlanta, GA USA) – See all my reviews
 
This review is from: Seal of the King (Kindle Edition)
When it comes to fantasy, I’m more accustomed to either made-up or ancient gods in a world of magic and fighting between the forces of good and evil. But this book felt fresh to me as a fantasy fan, because this is my first time reading a novel with a real, modern religion as a heavy basis for the story. That took some getting used to in the first half of the novel, but I eventually adjusted and just thought of it like an ancient tale, except A.D.

It felt a little slow going in the beginning, setting up the story and having the two main characters repeatedly thinking the same thoughts about each other and their new situation. But after the council arrives at the farmhouse, we get some more backstory that gives us clues about events down the line (and in the past) and things start to really pick up.

I liked that this book didn’t take place completely in one world or another but was a crossover of very different and distinct worlds. The fantasy novels I enjoy the most include a world (or several) hidden within our own or in parallel to our own…Percy Jackson, Pendragon, Harry Potter…all book series I’ve enjoyed over the last few years with that element.

One of the things I appreciate most about Seal Of the King though, is having a female character who’s truly the main character (in this case, co-main character) and can hold her own at the forefront of the story. I’ve been a fan of having stronger females in action/adventure/fantasy roles since I was a teenager, so I’m always excited when I come across a story containing one. Aurora’s no pushover: she’s battled hardened and finds it hard to trust, but she’s not so cold and rigid as to be unapproachable. She still has identifiable elements that make her human (and feminine). And her partner David is exactly the kind of humble, approachable guy you’d want a destined leader to be.

Disclaimer: I received this book as a gift. The opinion expressed above, however, is honestly and completely my own.

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